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02 April 2010 @ 02:58 pm
A Good Friday poem  
I hope this is appropriate-my church sometimes reads this poem as part of our Good Friday service and I wanted to share it with you all.

They Took Him Down

by Jimmy Owens from the cantata "No other Lamb"

They took Him down, His poor dead body,
and prepared Him for His burial.

They took Him down, His poor pale body
drained of life, ashen, and stained
with its own life-blood.

His healing hands, now pierced and still;
Serving hands, that broke five loaves
to feed five thousand;
Holy hands, often folded in fervent prayer;
Poor gentle hands, now pierced and still.

His poor torn feet, now bloodied and cold;
Feet that walked weary miles
to bring good news to broken hearts
Feet once washed in penitent's tears;
Poor torn feet, now bloodied and cold.

His kingly head, made for a crown,
now crowned—with thorns.
His poor kingly head, crowned with thorns.

His gentle breast, now pierced by
spear-thrust, quiet and still;
His poor loving breast.

His piercing eyes, now dark and blind;
Eyes of compassion, warming the soul;
Fiery eyes, burning at sin;
Tender eyes, beckoning sinners;
His piercing eyes, now dark and blind.

His matchless voice, fountain of the Father's
thoughts, stopped—
and stilled—to speak no more.
Silence now, where once had flowed
Wisdom and comfort, Spirit and life;
His matchless voice; stilled, to speak no more.

They took Him down, His poor dead body,
and prepared Him for his burial.


 
 
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Current Music: Long Haired Radical Socialist Jew
 
 
 
pastorlennypastorlenny on April 2nd, 2010 08:23 pm (UTC)
I might just quibble with this line:

His matchless voice; stilled, to speak no more.

He was certainly speaking again a few days later.
Cat: That socialist longhaired radical Jew!forensicgirl on April 3rd, 2010 01:34 am (UTC)
But note the present tense-the poet is saying, as far as I can see, that Jesus' voice is silent as they take His body down from the cross. That does not preclude His speaking again later. The poet probably was assuming that people reading or hearing his poem would know the Resurrection story and therefore understand that Jesus was silent then because He was dead.

The main contrast is between the pre-crucified, alive Jesus and the crucified, dead Jesus.

(Is pre-crucified even a word?)

Edited at 2010-04-03 01:37 am (UTC)